Thursday, April 2, 2015

Q&A - 2/4

Penn Jilette

It's amazing to me how many people think that voting to have the government give poor people money is compassion. Helping poor and suffering people is compassion. Voting for our government to use guns to give money to help poor and suffering people is immoral self-righteous bullying laziness. People need to be fed, medicated, educated, clothed, and sheltered, and if we're compassionate we'll help them, but you get no moral credit for forcing other people to do what you think is right. There is great joy in helping people, but no joy in doing it at gunpoint.

You are confused

I think these people live in a non-existent dreamland where they are in a small village and know John, Jane, Bob, say hi to them every morning, you know.. walk around in the town, if one is in need they help out, with a smile on their face.. Sadly this world does not exist, but help needs to reach to people who need it, somehow. Chances are we as citizens dont know Jane, dont know John, but they are in financial stress, in the meantime raise a troubled son who might just shoot our ass in a movie theater thanks to lax gun laws these rightwinger idiots also champion.

Jillette has problems presenting his ideas too; rightists do this all the time; exaggerate a policy in a way it comes across as threatening somehow. Like this Rick Scrotum.. or Santorum person, talking about legalizing gay marriage, he said once [paraphrasing] "next thing you know there'll be bestiality, bunch of weirdness, and then you're gonna marry your dog". You see what he is doing here, he jumps from one policy to something completely different, which happens to be some obnoxiously comical, bizarre act, and scares people with it (my example, above on the other hand, is completely plausible :)). Same with Jilette above; He doesn't like the policy, but instead of saying why in overall policy terms, he is like "government will use its guns on me to make me pay".

Washington Post

The poorer you are, the more things cost. More in money, time, hassle, exhaustion, menace. This is a fact of life that reality television and magazines don't often explain.  So we'll explain it here. Consider this a primer on the economics of poverty.

"The poor pay more for a gallon of milk; they pay more on a capital basis for inferior housing," says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.). "The poor and 100 million who are struggling for the middle class actually end up paying more for transportation, for housing, for health care, for mortgages. They get steered to subprime lending. . . . The poor pay more for things middle-class America takes for granted."

Damn